Mountain Gorilla

Mountain GorillaThe Mountain Gorilla, scientifically known as Gorilla beringei beringei, belongs to one of the two eastern gorilla subspecies. The other subspecies is the Eastern Lowland Gorilla (scientific name Gorilla beringei graueri). The mountain Gorillas are distributed as two set of populations. One population lies among the volcanoes of the Virunga Massif situated at the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the other population can be seen in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. High altitude forests are the typical habitat of these Gorillas. These forests are full of dense herb layer and minimum fruits. They can range up to an altitude of 3,400m or even higher.

The Mountain Gorilla, like other Gorillas, very densely furred and is black in color. The visage is very broad, and jaws are strong and huge. The long furs help them in surviving in the colder temperatures. Like other Gorillas, the adult male is called as silverback. Being the largest (on an average) of all Gorillas, a male can reach a height up to 2 meters standing tall and weighs 220 kg on an average. The measured arm span is about 2.3 meters. This Gorilla is terrestrial and also quadrupedal preferring knuckle walking like other great apes. They are highly social and stable, spending most of the time of their life with single mate.
Mountain Gorilla Mountain Gorilla Mountain Gorilla
Mountain Gorillas have a typical strong and threatening look, but they are very sigh and gentle by nature. There are many threats to this species but the primary threat to mountain gorillas comes from forest clearance and degradation, as the region’s growing human population seeks for a better and suitable way of living. International Gorilla Conservation Program (IGCP) was established by the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF), in collaboration with Fauna and Flora International and World Wide Fund for Nature to protect or safeguard the remaining mountain gorillas.



Posted by on Dec.23, 2011, under Info

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